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WILL MARS: CANDID CAFE

Comedy

Venue:Bar 50, Within SafeStay Edinburgh Hostel, 50 Blackfriars Street Edinburgh EH1 1NE
Phone: 0131 524 1989
Links: Click Here for venue details, Click here for map
Ticket Prices: Free  
Room: The Alcove
AUG 2-13, 15-26 at 15:30 (60 min)
 
Show Image

Star of FOX’s Showtime At The Apollo, finalist on Season 8 of NBC Comcast’s knockout television show, Trial By Laughter & runner-up for the woman he loves.

‘He had been making his mark on the New York scene only to come back for love and be dumped soon after the plane hit the runway’ (Bruce Dessau, Beyond The Joke).

'A paper read through of it would probably depress most people and Mars delivers it down at heel, looking like he is carrying the weight of the world on his shoulders. Usually this would result in a set that is unpalatable or simply kills the atmosphere, yet the quality of Mars’ writing and his ability to simultaneously talk to people and work their replies into the direction he wishes to go transforms it into a splendidly funny experience. (Peter Fox, Notts Comedy Review).

‘Damn that dude is funny!’ (Steve Harvey, Showtime at the Apollo).


Click Here for Show Website
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News and Reviews for this Show

August 19, 2018  The Mumble
How is it possible that from such an unassuming, almost melancholic delivery, volcanoes of comedy burst from our psyches to join everyone else’s in the audience, like the tectonic creation of a new world. That world belongs to Will Mars, a dedicated comedian with a surreptitious story to tell. In fact it is very much the story of being a stand-up, warts ‘n’ all, & deglosses some of the glory we lesser mortals assume when staring at the life-size technicolour images of the pantheon which surround us in the Edinburgh streets. According to Will Mars – and I do believe him – comedians are mortals too, who can bleed, & can also feel…

I do not want to give away the plot of his show, because every nuance of his tale must be appreciated without forewarning to fully appreciate the telling. A lovely Northern lad, he didn’t even need a microphone as he waltzed thro’ his rites of passage; from the gallon-a-girl gigolo of his early twenties, to the late 30s ‘worst version’ of Mr Mars, where he’s refreshingly unafraid to admit men also possess the tick-tick-ticking biological clock. It is impossible not to feel some kind of empathy for Will Mars, & he makes you laugh as you do so. As a storyteller he is a joy to experience; like a quirky terrier yapping jokes at our feet, when every now & again he’d sink his teeth into our calves with a hefty bite. Click Here

August 18, 2018  The List
Self-loathing, heartbreak and frequent punchlines.

Will Mars has had a terrible year and it shows. He ambles on stage, glares at the room with his sad eyes and asks us not to clap. He's not earned any applause yet. This isn't a gimmick: if Candid Café is anything, it's soaked in self-loathing. Fortunately, it just happens to also be a tightly-focused hour of comedy. The heartbreak and redemption narrative will win Mars no points for originality, but this is a show he can be pleased with.

Candid Café's arc is thus: Mars fell in love last year in Edinburgh, but was dumped in a quite brutal manner. Losing 'the one' has forced him to look in the mirror, considering how his life has panned out. He tells his story with an earnest desperation and, while we obviously only get one side of the story, it's savage nonetheless. 'You're a loser,' he says of himself, 'and you're 38.' He reminisces about his twenties, a time spent working (and womanising) at 18-30 holidays and says he was a 'nasty young guy'.

On paper it sounds miserable, but Mars crams a lot of smart gags into his hour. I'm not on board with all of it (sarcastically bemoaning his straightness as the reason for his not hitting the big time jars with the reflective tone) but it's an enjoyably cathartic performance nonetheless. Click Here

August 18, 2018  Mumble Comedy
Will Mars: Candid Cafe
How is it possible that from such an unassuming, almost melancholic delivery, volcanoes of comedy burst from our psyches to join everyone else’s in the audience, like the tectonic creation of a new world. That world belongs to Will Mars, a dedicated comedian with a surreptitious story to tell. In fact it is very much the story of being a stand-up, warts ‘n’ all, & deglosses some of the glory we lesser mortals assume when staring at the life-size technicolour images of the pantheon which surround us in the Edinburgh streets. According to Will Mars – and I do believe him – comedians are mortals too, who can bleed, & can also feel.

I do not want to give away the plot of his show, because every nuance of his tale must be appreciated without forewarning to fully appreciate the telling. A lovely Northern lad, he didn’t even need a microphone as he waltzed thro’ his rites of passage; from the gallon-a-girl gigolo of his early twenties, to the late 30s ‘worst version’ of Mr Mars, where he’s refreshingly unafraid to admit men also possess the tick-tick-ticking biological clock. It is impossible not to feel some kind of empathy for Will Mars, & he makes you laugh as you do so. As a storyteller he is a joy to experience; like a quirky terrier yapping jokes at our feet, when every now & again he’d sink his teeth into our calves with a hefty bite. Click Here

August 5, 2018  Edfringe Review
Will Mars: Candid Cafe
Seeing the words ‘stand-up’ and ‘tragedy’ side-by-side in the Fringe brochure fills me with a sense of impending doom. It takes a remarkable talent to balance the two, yet Will Mars approaches this challenge with the utmost confidence, despite his assurance he is very much a failure. What emerges is an unexpectedly touching performance which rattles along at impressive pace – a comic tour de force, but undeniably tragic.
Our host’s style is self-deprecating but strangely personable, taking a conversational tone from the moment he steps on stage (the only fanfare a monotone “yeah we’re starting” panned at an individual). Mars takes the old saying that humour is the best form of catharsis and runs with it, bringing the audience on a whirlwind tour of his life that at times is almost too much to take in; one moment he’s despairing that older women are dying out, the next he’s discussing the perils of vegetarianism (although, to his credit, the two are linked). Despite its casual delivery, the whole thing is ridiculously professional, and showcases the best of what Free Fringe can be. He’s a comic with experience – 10 years and 25 countries – and this comes through in the slickness of his delivery. Refreshingly, however, he doesn’t have the self-assured smugness which sometimes accompanies it – “if you’re an international comic, it just means you’re shit at home”.
One of the most surreal features of the show is the openness with which he discusses the comic lifestyle. Although the struggles of being a comedian are fairly common knowledge, it’s rare to have them framed quite so precisely – even to the extent of noting which jokes in his own act are scripted, as and when they appear. Mars discusses the American and British comic scenes with such candour that the title doesn’t just appear a cheap play-on-words. This is also the first time I have ever seen a stand-up director acknowledged, let alone discussed as a central plot-point.
The whole show plays well off the audience, who seem unusually open to interaction. I can’t think of many other people who would take a comparison to a porn star quite so well, and it’s a testament to the rapport he builds up throughout the act. But Mars comes into his own when he brings up serious moments of his life – and there are many – which manage to inspire a sort of respectful silence. Sometimes it seems in danger of becoming too much, but he never quite lets it cross that boundary, knowing when to mention a joke, or left-turn into an anecdote in order to lighten the mood. The audience which leaves are laughing just as much as the audience which enters, despite the heavy territory it crosses in-between. Stand-up and tragedy? It might just work.

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